What New Research Studies Have to Say About Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Preventing Myelodysplastic syndrome is not impossible.


Medical researchers and clinicians from around the world are continuously conducting research studies about Myelodysplastic syndrome, or MDS, expanding their efforts to address this disease effectively. With the innovations and breakthroughs in technology, it is predicted that a couple of years from now, all these efforts will pay off.

Though there are already a number of causes, diagnosis and treatments of MDS established in the medical field today, researchers are struggling to shift their focus to the prevention of the disease as there are scarcely few findings on how MDS could be avoided.

Reducing the risks to developing MDS is a challenge for everyone in the healthcare field since the exact cause is still unidentified and a lot of risk factors are also beyond medical control. However, scientists are putting their greatest efforts into understanding the changes in a person’s DNA that take place, causing a normal healthy cell to develop into a myelodysplastic affected cell. In addition, scientists are currently learning what the bone marrow stromal cells have to do in the development and progression of MDS cells. These bone marrow stromal cells are specific type of cells that can be found in one’s bone marrow, but do not form into blood cells. They support and nourish other new blood forming cells.

According to most research, though these cells are not known to be cancerous, they play a crucial role in the process of MDS cell development and progression. Through a number of research studies, experts are now beginning to figure out how the changes in cell development are linked to industrial chemical exposure of the patient’s mother or the patient himself. The level of exposure to industrial chemicals could be the single external factor that can be modified to reduce the risk of having MDS. The chemicals that increase the likelihood of developing myelodysplastic-infected cells are petrochemicals, rubber, and benzene.

Because total recall of these toxins in the market is impossible to impose, experts suggest that people who are exposed to these particular industrial chemicals need to increase their awareness on MDS and follow special defensive measures in order to protect themselves from these harmful chemicals. Every factory or industry using these chemicals has specific set of guidelines on how to minimize their exposure to these toxins. One technique is by wearing PPE or Personal Protective Equipment such as goggles, helmets, appropriate clothing, etc.

There is also a close definitive link between smoking and the development of MDS. People who have been smoking tobacco for the last twenty to thirty years of their life have increased chances of developing the disease. Tobacco is known to have over 4,000 different chemicals like benzene and nicotine that are harmful substances to human’s health. As a result, campaigns to stop smoking are strongly mobilized in order to make the detrimental effects of smoking, such as MDS, be made known to the public.

Doctors have also identified certain medical treatments like chemotherapy, as well as radiation therapy, to contribute to the development of myelodysplastic affected cells. Though the association is not strongly established and the possibility is very insignificant when compared to other risk factors, chemotherapy can influence the development and progression of MDS. So, if you have been receiving these forms of treatments, you should see your medical provider often and have a checkup regularly.



There are other associated modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors to having MDS. However, most research studies are focused on the risk factors that can still be prevented or avoided.


Related posts:

11 thoughts on “What New Research Studies Have to Say About Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  • Pingback: Myelodysplastic Syndrome - Life Expectancy, Prognosis, Treatment, Symptoms

  • 04/12/2012 at 2:28 PM
    Permalink

    Hi Dr. Amarendra! I have been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome after i have undergone my 6th cycle of chemotherapy just this year. I believe that chemotherapy really made those effects on my cells. I have been receiving therapies for the refractory anemia. But I’m wondering how soon do I expect my rbc to be normal again and is there a chance that I’ll be free of the condition? I think my doctor hasn’t explained these to me quite clearly. Thank you so much and you have a nice site keeping us informed.

    Reply
    • 05/12/2012 at 4:35 PM
      Permalink

      Hi Matthew! I came across your question as I was reading through the blog. I hate to say this, but myelodysplastic syndrome commonly has a poor prognosis. Most cases develop into acute myeloid leukemia after some time. However, there seem to be a better prognosis among younger patients and those that received treatment earlier. Stem cell transplantation also offer a 50% survival rate at 3 years. I will recommend talking to your doctor on what treatment options you may have.

      Reply
  • 12/04/2015 at 1:13 AM
    Permalink

    My wife aged 78 passed away with MDS last month. She was a very active lady, loved kayaking, cross-country skiing, and hiking. She was diagnosed in April 2013. She received 6 treatments of Vidaza, 7 straight days of Vidaza every 28 days, and went into remission for 12 months. Then the MDS can back with a bang, She lost weight from 124 lbs to 82 lbs and passed away last month. Always positive, always enjoying life.

    Reply
  • 18/04/2015 at 4:56 AM
    Permalink

    i.ve had mds for a year i.m doing chemo anemia is happening should i press for a bone marrow transplant i,m 68 with no energy.

    Reply
  • 18/04/2015 at 5:00 AM
    Permalink

    i.m 68 and have mds im doing chemo for a year and the anemia is getting bad should i press for a bone marrow transplant

    Reply
  • 07/01/2016 at 1:55 AM
    Permalink

    I am 89 with a count of 102 up from 90. Any suggestions?

    Reply
  • 07/01/2016 at 1:58 AM
    Permalink

    i am 89 with m.d.s and a count of 102 up from 90. i took epo

    Reply
  • 23/09/2016 at 6:03 AM
    Permalink

    I was diagnosed with MDS 5 years ago, and I am being treated with Procrit. When my HMG dropped to 8.4 last December, my oncologist wanted to start blood transfusions, which I refused. He increased my dosage to 6000 units and 3 weeks ago the HMG was 9.9. It took a sudden drop today to 9.0 and I’m worried. I am 85 years old, and I am urging my physician to delay blood transfusions should the HMG continue to decrease. Any suggestions for me. My doctor is competent, but I prefer not to have transfusions if there is another treatment. Vidaza has been considered.

    Reply
  • 15/10/2016 at 12:06 AM
    Permalink

    I’m 76 years old. I was diagnosed with MDS 2years ago as a result of chemotherapy (bendamustine & rituximab). I urge anyone whose doc recommends this treatment for your cancer to refuse and try the Gerson Therapy instead. I know that’s why I am still alive…my immune system is very strong because of Gerson Therapy. Also, watch on Utube “The Truth About Cancer” (9 episodes). Very enlightening!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.